The Undercover Soundtrack – Roz Morris

for logo‘First he hears sounds; urgent and deep, like a heartbeat in the ground’

Once a week I host a writer who uses music as part of their creative environment – perhaps to connect with a character, populate a mysterious place, or hold  a moment still to explore its depths. This week it’s my turn on the decks – with the Undercover Soundtrack for Lifeform Three

Soundtrack by Boards of Canada, Peter Gabriel, Enya, Vangelis, Gabor Presser, Ralph Vaughan Williams

Lifeform Three is a fable in the tradition of Ray Bradbury, set in the near future, where global warming has shrunk the landmass and the countryside has been sacrificed for buildings and roads. One valley remains, of woods, trees and meadows, and is now kept as a theme park – The Lost Lands of Harkaway Hall. My main character, Paftoo, is a groundsman there. He’s the odd one out; the only soul who’s uneasy in a world that everyone else accepts. You could say he lives in a utopia – but to him it’s a dystopia.

headshotcompMusic became the story

I knew the emotional beats of Lifeform Three before I knew the story. They came to me as pieces of music, a chain of albums and tracks that suggested the landmarks of the novel. I would load them into my MP3 player and take them running, puzzling over them as I pounded out the miles.

Paftoo is a bod – an artificial human who’s programmed to do menial tasks. To keep him efficient, his memory is regularly wiped, but he has inklings of other memories. We meet him after such an event (known as a ‘sharing’).  My first beat was that state of newness, a world shining and fresh where you go out and do your tasks, content with simple instructions. In the beginning, Paftoo doesn’t even know his own name until he realises the sole of his boot has a number – 2 (his name is an alphanumeric, short for Park Asset Field Redo Bod 2).

Boards of Canada’s album Music Has The Right To Children told me the innocence of new, eager eyes, especially this track, An Eagle In Your Mind.

The novelty doesn’t last long. There’s a wildness in Paftoo and by the end of his first day, he’s made the others wary of him. He’s also frustrated. But worse is to come when night falls. While his companions go dormant and lifeless, Paftoo starts to dream.

Again, the idea came as a feeling from music – Peter Gabriel’s soundtrack to The Last Temptation of Christ suggested a tingling in the nerves, a meaning that must be grasped.

First he hears sounds; urgent and deep, like a heartbeat in the ground

The dream sequence was choreographed to that album. It starts with a sense of unease, then that beat gallops in like the thing you knew was coming.

Horses, flashing across the green hills in glorious gallop. Necks reaching, tails streaming. Riders on their backs, urging them faster.

Paftoo opens his eyes, shocked. He knows he’s not supposed to dream. He also knows that nobody rides horses now. They’re untamed animals in the fields (and known as Lifeform Three). But at the same time it makes perfect sense in his restless soul. From that moment, Paftoo has a mission. Every night, he goes looking for clues that might explain why he has these dreams and what happened to him before his mind was wiped. By day, he struggles to hide his true nature in case he’s wiped again.

Old memories 

In a small way the story is autobiographical. In winter 1995 I acquired a horse, which had been an ambition since I was a kid. Like the horse Paftoo later befriends, my horse was enormous, black and alarmingly excited to be alive – especially with the frost nipping his clipped skin. I was laughably incompetent on his back, especially when trying to stop him. While sceptical (and wise) folk waited for me to give up and sell him, I was determined to persevere. If I couldn’t handle my dream, what did that make me? That first winter, Enya’s Anywhere Is was in the charts. I wasn’t a fan of her music, but when I came to write Paftoo’s attempts to tame a horse I listened to Enya to capture that time. For some reason Caribbean Blue with its waltz rhythm brought back the sense of a wondrous adventure, the tentative courtship of a wild creature and the sense of being alone on a dumb-headed quest for something inexplicable and ideal.

A song called Caribbean Blue that takes me back to an English winter, riding horses? Like dreams, Undercover Soundtracks have a logic of their own. Or I take no notice of lyrics.

During the writing, my soundtracks had to become a time machine. Those first days with my oversized horse were, as you can probably see, long ago.  Reader, I kept him, and he was now reaping the arthritic rewards of a vigorous life. I was having ghastly conversations with the vet because if her treatments didn’t work it was time for the gun. I clung to those music tracks to help me give his glory days to Paftoo while the real situation seemed so hopeless. Thankfully, he rallied and we gallop on (on a good day).

Lost humanity

The horse awakens Paftoo’s sense of the natural world, which humanity seems to have lost. Again, music already contained what I needed to say.  Vangelis’s Pulsar was the thrill of galloping feet

‘gathering up the miles and throwing them out behind’.

Electromantic La Baletta No 2 – by the Hungarian composer Gabor Presser had feisty, fertile joy, like a primitive spring ritual. It smells of untamed hair and corduroy.  And whoever said electronic music lacked a soul? Both these tracks are entirely electronic, made from circuits and wave generators, yet they bound and leap like wild animals.

coverLF3Past, people and a vanished time

But there’s a lot more to Paftoo’s quest than riding and nature. They are merely the beginning; the gateway to a profound discovery of his own past and the people and creatures he loves. Now I’m trying to avoid spoilers, but I can say that the more he recovers, the more he stands to lose and the more desperate his day life becomes. This impossibility was exquisitely insisted in Ralph Vaughan Williams’s The Lark Ascending.

The piece was written in 1914 and 1920, in an England changed forever by the first World War. That period would also be the heyday of Harkaway Hall, the mansion that used to stand at the heart of the Lost Lands, where Paftoo now struggles to keep his memories. The Lark Ascending  seems to say that what will be lost is more than just the loves of a few souls in a little story; it speaks for the loss of time, grace, of fallen walls in overgrown woods, bumps under the turf in an empty field. That violin seems to be shrilling from the skies: it won’t last. We won’t last. And how can Paftoo save it?

Roz Morris is, of course, your host on The Undercover Soundtrack. Find out more here, connect on Twitter as @Roz_Morris and on the writing advice blog Nail Your Novel. Her first novel was My Memories of a Future Life (Soundtrack here) and Lifeform Three is now available in all formats, including print.

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  1. #1 by tomburkhalter on January 8, 2014 - 1:10 pm

    Hi, Roz,
    I envy your approach. I’m not sure if the phrase “artistic sensibility” applies, but only because, like the word “intuition”, it gets overused. What I do envy is the sense I get from this blog that you have found a way to live so that your life and your art are inextricably intertwined. It reminds me of how I felt far too many decades ago — but “far too many” just means I haven’t thought about life and art that way for a long time. Thanks for the reminder!

    When I started researching my books about WW2 fighter pilots I started listening to big band music — Glenn Miller, Artie Shaw, the Dorsey Brothers, etc. — and grew to like it. I think music is one of the ways you can tune your mind to a different place.

    Some of my characters have theme songs. Karen Ardana (in a future novel) is definitely “Legs” by ZZTop. Jack Baumer is “Gear Jammer” by George Thorogood and the Destroyers. And so on.

    I’ve got Vaughn Williams in my library, along with Vangelis, Enya, and some of the others you mention.

    Well, just wanted to say good and informative post, and thanks!

    Tom

    • #2 by rozmorris @NailYourNovel @ByRozMorris on January 8, 2014 - 7:04 pm

      Hi Tom! What a lovely observation. I think I live in a way that has to find its expression in creative work, and writing is the one that suits me best. I have a ‘creative ethic’ – the urge to make things and to share why an idea affects me. Hope you reclaim yours too – I’m sure you will once you allow it to flourish again.
      Thanks so much for the comment. I’ve shepherded so many of these Undercover Soundtracks into the blogosphere, but when it’s your own book you wonder if you’ve hit the right note.

  2. #3 by Will Overby (@Will_Overby) on January 8, 2014 - 6:32 pm

    Awesome article, Roz! I totally relate to what you said about logic and not paying attention to lyrics. For me it’s more about the *feel* of the music, not necessarily the words, the meaning, or even the artist’s intentions.

    • #4 by rozmorris @NailYourNovel @ByRozMorris on January 8, 2014 - 7:05 pm

      Thanks, Will! You’re dead right – the feel of the music is everything. I think that’s why I don’t – like some writers – get distracted by lyrics. It’s because I simply don’t hear them! Or I make up my own half-heard versions to go with the impressions I’m getting.

  3. #5 by Trevor Veale on January 15, 2014 - 12:54 am

    Hi Roz. Who knew what a merry-to-mellow musical pathway led to Paftoo’s genesis? Like the aethereal Emma and the sunken remnants of her manor, the pieces of music you share awaken the longing for remembered happiness that Paftoo feels so keenly.
    I love the way you took from the techno trills of Vengelis and Presser and the warbling notes of Vaughan Williams’s lark the perfect blend of AI and English pastoral that is the world of Lifeform Three. The struggles of Paftoo and his huge black horse, the improbably-named Pea, to attain the life of free spirits now have their fitting musical counterparts. A superb post. 🙂

    • #6 by rozmorris @NailYourNovel @ByRozMorris on January 15, 2014 - 7:15 am

      Hi Trevor! It is quite a merry collection, isn’t it? I suppose I was most aware that this would be a story of loss, and so I found music that would make me feel that most keenly. Thanks for commenting!

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